Celebrating the movie franchise that sparked creativity in me!

It’s October 21, 2015. If you haven’t already figured out by the countless Facebook posts and news articles, that’s the day to Marty McFly travels in 1989’s Back to the Future Part II.

Many people have fond memories of these movies and I’m not different. Back to the Future, along with Beverly Hills Cop, were the two movies not branded with Disney or Don Bluth that I watched over and over and over on VHS as a kid, the first two “adult” movies that I only only liked, but understood and appreciated in some way I couldn’t explain. While most jokes and cultural reference points of both the 50’s and the 80’s flew over my little munchkin head, I was thrilled by the idea of time travel; the concept of going back in time and changing things to how you wish they could be. And even moreso by the idea introduced in Part 2 and expanded upon in 3 of what was essentially the butterfly effect (though Doc never uses such a term.) I realized very early on that Back to the Future wasn’t a coming of age story for Marty, it was a coming of age story for Doc. Here was a man who dedicated his life to science and the invention of time travel to the brink of bankruptcy, to the point of helping terrorists, literally laying his life on the line, and learning to stop thinking about the past and the future but instead focus on the present. Fascinating stuff, even for a kid. Back to the Future Part 3 is far & away my favorite of the trilogy, but inevitably I just end up watching all three parts.

I could argue Back to the Future is the movie that inspired me to make movies, or at least write stories.

We had the first Back to the Future film on VHS, but I had to wait to record Parts 2 & 3 from TV before I could watch them on any sort of regular basis. But I very vividly remember being so enthralled with the first film that I sat down with a notebook and started writing a sort-of novelization of the first movie, from memory. I remember taking the notebook to Pizza Hut and proudly displaying my hundreds of words (probably poorly) depicting the first 20 minutes or so of the first Back to the Future film.

BTTF later bled into almost everything else creative I did. The Adventures in Hot Springs’ 7 day proposed themed-episodic structure would have allowed me to experiment with different genres I always wanted to try to film: Night in Hot Springs was suspense, Quest for the Lost Treasures (and later Jamie Klotz’s Diary 1) were the Indiana Jones-influenced adventure/treasure hunt films, 1001 Arabian Gumps was an homage to the Disney Renaissance, War of the Dandelions was a space opera on the ground, and Paradox was shades of Back to the Future through & through. (read: plagiarism)

Bttf.com was a constant web visit through my adolescence, the crappy TV recordings (with dubbed dialogue over the swear words) were replaced by the 2002 “Complete Trilogy” VHS boxed set with bonus features tacked onto the ends of the tapes, which I devoured, then those were in turn replaced with the DVD set, full of commentaries and extra making-of features. I remember reading a report talking about how Back to the Future’s script is one of the best scripts in movie history; not in the sense of quality or cultural value, though one could argue for that as well, but instead that no line or shot is wasted in moving the story forward. Every detail is paid off somewhere else later in the film.

In 2011, when the Back to the Future video game by Telltale came out (pre-their Walking Dead days) I was all in, buying them for PC as soon as I could and was thrilled by the story and world created within that game, what I consider Back to the Future part 4. That Christmas, two different gift buyers got me copies of the game, for Wii and PS3, and I played through both again, happily, and will again on PS4 with the new edition.

I didn’t mention it in the Origins blogs, but the original Jamie Klotz’s Diary script drafts included an element of time travel. The watch that Dr. Lawrence invents originally jumped time, not other dimensions. The movie would have opened with a flashback to the 1880’s and Jamie’s ancestor Jessica and Christoff Dorn’s ancestor, who was unnamed in all drafts, would have been introduced, as well as the idea of the treasures existing even then. There are still elements of this in Dr. Lawrence’s story he tells Kaitlyn & Jamie. Later, when Dorn slaps the watch on Jamie, rather than meeting the Man, she would have met her ancestor in the “old west” a la BTTF Part 3. These scenes were replaced (for the better IMO) with the Man’s scenes due to budget constraints.

Dr. Lawrence in the final movie still very obviously references Doc Brown, but that was as far as I thought the BTTF-Jamie Klotz connection would go…. until the cast asked to do another one. Of all the genres encompasses in the scripts for the Adventures in Hot Springs, time travel was always the one that fascinated me most, because of BTTF, and the influence of BTTF Part 2’s thick-with-exposition story specifically, on me led directly to Jamie Klotz’s Diary 2 and its story of altered timelines, past, present & future.

I’ve said before that if there were to be a Jamie Klotz’s Diary 3 (and there likely won’t be) it would have to be a western, in tribute to BTTF 3.

So long story short (too late), I’m thrilled to be celebrating Back to the Future Day before I leap in to my next big project, The Christmas Heist, which is also slightly inspired by 80’s teen movies like BTTF, and the many many many John Hughes films of the 80s.

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