Kazoo Hero | Short Film (2009)

Re-edited and re-mastered from scratch using new transfers of the original source tape, Kazoo Hero pits Gump (Jesse Needham) against the Grim Reaper in a spoof of the music video of the obscure sequel song “Devil Comes Back to Georgia.”

Contains some previously unreleased video and lip-sync fixes. No random baby, though.

Starring
Jesse Needham as “Gump”
Hunter Cutchin as “Death”
Justin Gausman as “Preacher”

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True Love Sunglasses (Remake) | Short Skit (2008)

 

Recently restored & re-edited from original tape & digital transfer sources.

The original True Love Sunglasses – made for a school project making a commercial for a fake product – was the first short I was ever involving in filming. This remake was shot as part of the “Adventures in Hot Springs” webseries in 2009.

Re-Discovering Skeeter Bite History

My original set of Hi8 and Digital8 tapes.

On September 28, 2009, I wrote a blog entitled “8MM Blues,” bemoaning the fact that there was footage on a number of 2005-2007-era tapes that I never got to transfer – and never got to edit! After a number of failed attempts, I had to come to terms with the idea that either I would one day go back and transfer everything, or never transfer it at all, and be okay with myself in either case.

Fast forward over 7 years later to early 2016. Finally in a place with some disposable income, I ordered a Digital8 camcorder online and set about preserving several of the tapes, including one tape of A Day in Hot Springs raw footage, leading to the 10th Anniversary re-edit of that short film utilizing that newly restored footage. Much of the student life/high school footage on those tapes were left un-transferred again intentionally – I simply didn’t feel the need to. On nearly every tape, there were still parts that were unreadable by the specific Digital8 model I owned. I needed an older Hi-8 model if I planned on seeing the rest of the footage again.

Fast forward another year and a half to October 2017. A spur of the moment decision to finally transfer the student life footage led me to rewinding all of the tapes to their beginnings and capturing every frame I could find. Enter the lost Quest for the Lost Treasures footage.

A never before seen shot from newly rediscovered “Quest for the Lost Treasures” video.

At the beginning of a tape that was otherwise dedicated to little else but video of “edgy” mid-00’s teenagers flipping the camera the bird was almost 14 minutes of Summer 2006-era Jim, Jesse and myself, shooting inserts and partial scenes. These 14 minutes, which I had not seen in over 11 years, sent me down a rabbit hole that led me to finally ordering a Hi-8 camera on eBay with the intent of resolving an almost decade-long mystery.

What I found was collectively 8+ hours of video, with almost an hour and a half of raw video specifically tied to Skeeter Bite short film productions, the earliest of which dated back to literally the first thing we ever shot in 2005, for an Indiana Jones fan film that never made it beyond the opening shots and that I had honestly thought had been taped over or lost altogether.

Me in some of the first footage I ever directed as a filmmaker. Gump was running camera duties. Summer 2005.

Also rescued was a substantial amount of footage from the attempt at a folksy webseries in the vein of Red Green, “Taterfied”, starring our buddy Josh “Tater” Tatum. Previously, only 6 seconds of blocky, low-res video remained – now almost 20 minutes of raw footage, including a whole short sketch, is now available.

Finally, there was the raw footage of our Super Mario Bros fan film starring my friend Drake Piper. None of the footage had previously been transferred, but there was enough footage to finally edit together the complete film, which I have now finished and will post in a follow-up.

The excitement of finding “new” footage and even video that had been transferred years in marginally better quality has pushed me further down the path of re-editing a number of original Skeeter Bite shorts that suffered from resolution, aspect ratio and editing issues.

Aside from the Super Mario fan film, I’m re-editing for the final time a number of “Adventures in Hot Springs” shorts. Furthermore, several of those shorts will be edited into a feature-length “The Week in Hot Springs” movie that uses text cards to flesh out the overarching story and context between scenes as originally intended.

10 Years Ago…

Thanks for the memories Taylor, Gump, Jim, Scott, Jake, Matt and Tater!

In May 2006, a class at Hot Springs High School was assigned an end-of-year project by their teacher, who was sick of hearing “there’s nothing to do in Hot Springs” from her students. Everyone was supposed to make a video showing what they do on an average day in Hot Springs. Taylor Lund and Jesse WhenyaNeedham were in that class and came to me and said “let’s make a video!” They gave me a bunch of ideas for scenes and jokes and I wrote the script. We called a bunch of our friends and on May 19, 2006, with a borrowed Digital 8 camcorder, we started filming “A Day in Hot Springs.”
The kicker? The video starts off with Jesse and Taylor hanging out, then it completely goes off rails into things that would NEVER happen – a ninja attacks, they meet an Indiana Jones-esque adventurer, get lost underground, visit the “Tater Lodge,” and even encounter the mysterious “Mt. Dew Monster.”
The creation of the video itself was the statement – this is what we do on an average day; we make our own fun. It premiered the following Monday – they got docked a few points because it was too long.
This was one of the very first things I ever wrote, shot and edited. It’s terrible, it’s nonsensical, it has no plot and the jokes are ripped off. But after the school year was up, Jesse and I sat down at Centennial Park and started writing Quest for the Lost Treasures: Another Day in Hot Springs with a plan to make it into a 7-part series (one for each day of the week) of what we nowadays would call a webseries that would have been posted to MySpace (and in fact still is – https://myspace.com/thegaus/video/the-quest-for-the-lost-treasures/54150771?mri=54150771)
Throughout 2006-2007, we wrote the rest of “The Week in Hot Springs” and shot a huge chunk of it all the way through 2009, but never quite finished it. It suddenly had a plot spanning different dimensions and time travel, shamelessly ripping off everything from Aladdin to Revenge of the Sith, and featured an adversary known only as “The Man” …….sound familiar? This one project inevitably led to the Jamie Klotz’s Diary series, and indirectly to Blue Suede Reviews and even Never Been to Graceland.
The original short was edited in Windows Movie Maker from a 240p transfer directly from the camera. I always swore one day I would track down a Digital8 camera again and transfer what footage didn’t get recorded over and re-edit it at a higher quality. I finally did last year, and I’ve held off on posting this just for this day. This is the result. (Most of the higher quality footage is in the latter half).
I probably re-edited this thing problem 5-6 times before 2010 as various “special editions”, adding overdubbed dialogue, adding special effects, music and sound effects, fixing typos and every single time, still finding things that I screwed up. True to form, there is a typo in one of the titles in the 2016 version. Maybe one day I’ll get this f**king thing right.

Celebrating the movie franchise that sparked creativity in me!

It’s October 21, 2015. If you haven’t already figured out by the countless Facebook posts and news articles, that’s the day to Marty McFly travels in 1989’s Back to the Future Part II.

Many people have fond memories of these movies and I’m not different. Back to the Future, along with Beverly Hills Cop, were the two movies not branded with Disney or Don Bluth that I watched over and over and over on VHS as a kid, the first two “adult” movies that I only only liked, but understood and appreciated in some way I couldn’t explain. While most jokes and cultural reference points of both the 50’s and the 80’s flew over my little munchkin head, I was thrilled by the idea of time travel; the concept of going back in time and changing things to how you wish they could be. And even moreso by the idea introduced in Part 2 and expanded upon in 3 of what was essentially the butterfly effect (though Doc never uses such a term.) I realized very early on that Back to the Future wasn’t a coming of age story for Marty, it was a coming of age story for Doc. Here was a man who dedicated his life to science and the invention of time travel to the brink of bankruptcy, to the point of helping terrorists, literally laying his life on the line, and learning to stop thinking about the past and the future but instead focus on the present. Fascinating stuff, even for a kid. Back to the Future Part 3 is far & away my favorite of the trilogy, but inevitably I just end up watching all three parts.

I could argue Back to the Future is the movie that inspired me to make movies, or at least write stories.

We had the first Back to the Future film on VHS, but I had to wait to record Parts 2 & 3 from TV before I could watch them on any sort of regular basis. But I very vividly remember being so enthralled with the first film that I sat down with a notebook and started writing a sort-of novelization of the first movie, from memory. I remember taking the notebook to Pizza Hut and proudly displaying my hundreds of words (probably poorly) depicting the first 20 minutes or so of the first Back to the Future film.

BTTF later bled into almost everything else creative I did. The Adventures in Hot Springs’ 7 day proposed themed-episodic structure would have allowed me to experiment with different genres I always wanted to try to film: Night in Hot Springs was suspense, Quest for the Lost Treasures (and later Jamie Klotz’s Diary 1) were the Indiana Jones-influenced adventure/treasure hunt films, 1001 Arabian Gumps was an homage to the Disney Renaissance, War of the Dandelions was a space opera on the ground, and Paradox was shades of Back to the Future through & through. (read: plagiarism)

Bttf.com was a constant web visit through my adolescence, the crappy TV recordings (with dubbed dialogue over the swear words) were replaced by the 2002 “Complete Trilogy” VHS boxed set with bonus features tacked onto the ends of the tapes, which I devoured, then those were in turn replaced with the DVD set, full of commentaries and extra making-of features. I remember reading a report talking about how Back to the Future’s script is one of the best scripts in movie history; not in the sense of quality or cultural value, though one could argue for that as well, but instead that no line or shot is wasted in moving the story forward. Every detail is paid off somewhere else later in the film.

In 2011, when the Back to the Future video game by Telltale came out (pre-their Walking Dead days) I was all in, buying them for PC as soon as I could and was thrilled by the story and world created within that game, what I consider Back to the Future part 4. That Christmas, two different gift buyers got me copies of the game, for Wii and PS3, and I played through both again, happily, and will again on PS4 with the new edition.

I didn’t mention it in the Origins blogs, but the original Jamie Klotz’s Diary script drafts included an element of time travel. The watch that Dr. Lawrence invents originally jumped time, not other dimensions. The movie would have opened with a flashback to the 1880’s and Jamie’s ancestor Jessica and Christoff Dorn’s ancestor, who was unnamed in all drafts, would have been introduced, as well as the idea of the treasures existing even then. There are still elements of this in Dr. Lawrence’s story he tells Kaitlyn & Jamie. Later, when Dorn slaps the watch on Jamie, rather than meeting the Man, she would have met her ancestor in the “old west” a la BTTF Part 3. These scenes were replaced (for the better IMO) with the Man’s scenes due to budget constraints.

Dr. Lawrence in the final movie still very obviously references Doc Brown, but that was as far as I thought the BTTF-Jamie Klotz connection would go…. until the cast asked to do another one. Of all the genres encompasses in the scripts for the Adventures in Hot Springs, time travel was always the one that fascinated me most, because of BTTF, and the influence of BTTF Part 2’s thick-with-exposition story specifically, on me led directly to Jamie Klotz’s Diary 2 and its story of altered timelines, past, present & future.

I’ve said before that if there were to be a Jamie Klotz’s Diary 3 (and there likely won’t be) it would have to be a western, in tribute to BTTF 3.

So long story short (too late), I’m thrilled to be celebrating Back to the Future Day before I leap in to my next big project, The Christmas Heist, which is also slightly inspired by 80’s teen movies like BTTF, and the many many many John Hughes films of the 80s.