Skeeter Bite Scraps

In 2003, I wrote my first play that was performed in choir class. True to form, it was Elvis-inspired, and called “Viva Las Vegas 2.” Classmates performed, with me injecting Elvis songs in the flimsy plot. I had thought it had been lost (either on a tape I didn’t own, or recorded over) until I recently re-discovered it on an old VHS tape. And so that means 2018 marks 15 years since I first really started developing stories to tell, be they films, plays or short stories.

Over the past few years, I’ve been slowly going through, re-transferring old Hi-8 and miniDV tapes and even getting old hard drives repaired, full of raw footage.

I’ve uploaded videos of student life at my high school, re-edited & remastered many of the short films that were completed, and even pieced together short films that had only been partly shot, like Taterfied and The Big Play.

This video represents essentially everything else that’s left in the Skeeter Bite Productions video archives worth looking at. Short of uploading complete, unedited files, this both marks a celebration of everything that we’ve made the last 15 years and shows the progression in terms of quality and purpose.

There are partial scenes from unfinished shorts, raw test footage (some only seconds in length), outtakes & behind the scenes shots, alternate and unused scenes from otherwise finished projects… literally scraps.

Here’s a breakdown of everything you’ll see

-The first video I ever shot, of downtown Hot Springs
-Indiana Jones Fan Film: Test footage for an Indiana Jones fan film in 2005. I’m playing the Indy stand-in and you can hear Jesse and Matt behind the camera. These first few clips were recovered from an old Hi-8 tape.
-Wise Man on the Rock: This was the next short film we attempted to make, but it was mostly recorded over except these few seconds. Essentially, Jesse would have gone to seek out Matt, playing the titular Wise Man, for some sage advice. Later, this character was merged into the Mountain Dew Monster from A Day in Hot Springs, and in fact, in some versions of that film, Jim even says “That’s not the Mountain Dew Monster, that’s the old man on the rock!” This is sourced from the original digital transfer of the tape – the tape was subsequently recorded over again.
-Jesse & Matt playing pool: just the intro of this, though there’s probably a good 10 minutes of them playing on the tape.
-Daniel during MASH: Just a snippet of Daniel Crossman (who would later play “The Man” in Jamie Klotz’s Diary) during the HSHS Drama production of MASH in the fall of 2005. This snippet was actually played at the Jamie Klotz’s Diary premiere, and is from the original 2005 digital transfer of the MASH footage, which was uploaded alongside the rest of the HSHS Student Life footage from that year. The original footage was taped over.
-Taterfied Outtakes: just a short clip shot in the shop class room. Also from the original student life digital transfer.
-A Day in Hot Springs Outtakes: All of this footage here is sourced from the original May 2006 digital transfer. Only the third tape of footage was recovered in 2016. All shown here is from the first or second tape, but these show the progression of the Indiana Jones/adventure concept, and the “Peanut Butter Ninja,” a phrase which would show up against in Jamie Klotz’s Diary 2
-Paradox Unused Scenes: We reshot a substantial portion of this, so this variation showing Jesse & Jim’s “thinking rocks” (a predecessor to Jamie Klotz’s “thinking caps” scene) has never been seen before. This is sourced from the original 2006 tape transfer.
-Pocket Lint Outtakes: Just a random outtake from Pocket Lint. This footage was all taped over, so this is from the original tape transfer.
-Death and Gump Outtakes: This tape is one of the better-preserved ones from that period. Although the source miniDV tape was recorded over, before it had been taped over, I had made a full backup on Matt’s DVD recorder, which is the same process I used in 2017 when I backed up all the still-existing tapes. This footage comes from a 480p rip of that DVD.
-Unused Jesse & Jim Video: I had forgotten we’d filmed this until I rediscovered it transferring tapes in 2017. It had never been transferred & backed up before then.
-True Love Sunglasses Outtake: from a new transfer of the original miniDV tape. This same source was used for the remastered TLS, which included a new post-credits scene.
-Turtlesphere Q Test Footage: Another literal scrap. We intended on shooting a Dragonball Evolution spoof but only shot this. This was the same day we shot the “Taylor’s Bad Day” footage that was used in the new “movie” version of The Week in Hot Springs.
-The Frog Gump: Partial scenes from an incomplete short intended for the “Adventures in Hot Springs” webseries in 2009. The same frog puppet would be used in Jamie Klotz’s Diary and SideQuests. In the latter portion with Matt as the Genie of the Trashcan, I’m puppeteering with the intent to have Jesse dub the footage later with his voice. This footage is all from a 2017 miniDV transfer.
-Kazoo Hero Vocal Tracks: Recovered from a broken hard drive, these are the original raw vocal tracks recorded for Kazoo Hero in 2009, separated from the music. The video is from the remaster done in 2017 from a miniDV tape transfer.
-A Minute in the Park with Gump: Exactly what it says. It was the last thing I shot with Jesse. This marks the transition from tape transfers to digital video. Shot with the same camera used on Jamie Klotz’s Diary and in the same location as the park chase scene in the first JKD.
-Jamie Klotz’s Diary Deleted Sequence: We shot a bit of footage before the take starts, and then it continues with the edited sequence. This was to play into Dr. Lawrence’s “can’t even water the flowers at the end of the driveway” line, to signify a change of heart for him that would pay off at the end of the movie. We cut it after we shot Jamie & Kaitlyn just leaving after the conversation with Dr. Lawrence.
-Jamie Klotz’s Diary Footage: An outtake of the park “Rocky” gag, a rehearsal and alternate version of Jamie’s missing socks monologue at the start of the film (which was changed when we realized Jamie shouldn’t be in her pajamas during that scene), an outtake of the “Babycakes” scene
-Christmas Radio: A clip from a rehearsal and a small portion of the performance in December 2013.
-The Big Play Rehearsal: Taken from the same read-through that is used in the edited version of The Big Play, we actually read and walked through all first three episodes of The Big Play. This shows a scene from the third episode.
-Jamie Klotz’s Diary 2: an assortment of outtakes, alternate takes, a rehearsal, and a multi-angle of The Man in Dark Gray being pushed into Cascade Springs.
-The Black Owl: A shot of Black Owl and Chickadee running past the camera, meant to pay homage to Batman films with similar shots.
-The Christmas Heist: a handful of scenes from auditions and rehearsals for this Southern Hills Community Theatre show in 2015. I actually filmed every rehearsal for this show in full but the hard drive THAT footage is on has been crashed for almost a year and awaits recovery.
-SideQuests: Alternate takes from SideQuests. Incidentally, Zach Cox makes an offhand remark about not needing to cheat out as much since filming a short film is different from being on stage in a play.
-I Sent My Grandma…: The original ending featured Jordyn as Zoey delivering the closing speech entirely alone, as seen here in this rehearsal. Later, we changed it to have the whole cast deliver the lines most relevant to their character.
-Never Been to Graceland Alternate Narration: This deleted narration wasn’t featured on the DVD deleted scenes or online later. It was determined that the full freeze-frame-and-narration wasn’t necessary and only served to slow the film’s opening down.
-NB2G Improv Outtakes: Tyler Mathieson, as “Dan the Man” gave us multiple variations on what his character might yell when awakened during the final scene of the film. They’re compiled here.
-NB2G Deleted Scene w/Temp Music: Beyond the fact that we were never going to get the rights to Roy Hamilton’s “You’ll Never Walk Alone” on our budget for the commercially-available version of the film, this scene was cut anyway to tighten the pace and story around Michael as the protagonist. This is the scene as it was in the first edit, with temp music included.
-Viva Las Vegas 2 Clips – Recovered from a VHS tape, from 2003. Fun fact: in the first cut of “Graceland”, that deleted scene literally does end with a transition to Elvis’ “Follow That Dream” over a travel montage that was also cut. That it also happened to be one of the songs I had in 2003’s skit “Viva Las Vegas 2” brings everything full circle nicely I think.

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The Week in Hot Springs | Unfinished Movie

This is it. After 12 years, the story of “The Week in Hot Springs” is finally able to be told. I’ve scrounged tapes and old digital transfers for anything usable – scraps of scenes, long lost outtakes, half-baked ideas, incomplete shorts – and re-edited everything completely from scratch, and fleshed out the unfilmed parts of the story with interstitial titles. There is one new piece of content. We never shot anything for “The War of the Dandelions,” the final 7th episode. So with the help of some young actors, one scene has been read through to finally finish the project.

If we had the time, the resources, and the patience, this is the story we would have and almost told.

It’s terrible. There’s no continuity. There’s no production values. The acting’s all over the place. Most of the the plot makes no sense. There’s no pacing, no flow. But fuck it. We tried.

Tater Lodge Forever!

4 Years Ago Today

Four years ago today, I sat up late writing what would become the first outline of Never Been to Graceland.

The first outline was much zanier. Instead of a long-lost song, the MacGuffin was a long-lost Elvis film that had been canned under the orders of Colonel Parker. Michael, traveling cross-country to see the film “because he’s seen every Elvis movie and has to see the last one,” ran across a deluded fan who claimed to be the daughter of Elvis and Ann-Margret, a biker gang, a mega-rich collector of rock and roll memorabilia, and a duo of bumbling private investigators hired by AJ’s parents to find her when she stows away in the back of Michael’s truck (unbeknownst to him.) Oh, did I forget to mention? AJ, now a reporter, in the early drafts was a teenager on the run and in its earliest incarnations, “Graceland” attempted to blend the silliness of Willy Wonka and It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad World with echoes of the grounded, on-the-road cinematic sensibility of Terence Malick’s “Badlands”… all under the umbrella of a celebration of the phenomenon that is the fandom of Elvis Presley.

Four years ago today, I was still smack in the middle of editing The Incredible Search for Jamie Klotz’s Diary, trying desperately to prove that I could make a movie, period, let alone a good one or coherent one. I had announced Graceland at the premiere of Jamie Klotz’s Diary. It was my “end goal.” Knowing how long and how many failed projects it took before I got to Jamie Klotz, I have to confess I honestly don’t know if I ever thought I’d really actually make Graceland. If I was going to follow this dream, why not shoot as far as I could imagine?

My mistake.

A few days ago I sat down and watched Jamie Klotz’s Diary for the first time in about a year. Whenever I have a new project that’s about to be released, I always end up watching old projects to just reflect. I’d forgotten how funny that movie was, but also, too, how endearing its low-budget workarounds were. I still saw so many things I wish I could just back go in and fix – visual effects, camera moves, sound quirks. Then I switched over and watched Graceland one more time, looking for any possible reason to make any last minute changes or fixes. I couldn’t find one. It is literally as good as it is going to get.  Short of re-shooting, I couldn’t fix anything else… and I wouldn’t want to anyway.

So here I am, trying to savor every moment of this, because I don’t know when the next one will be, or if there WILL be a “next one.” I’ve got ideas, some of which I might even talk about at the premieres during the Q&A, but I’m not committed to anything. I’m going to spend a lot of time next week thanking people. I mean every word of it, and if I forget anyone, I’m incredibly sorry. This has been an amazing four years and it couldn’t have been done without help.

My only hope now is that it resonates with the right people.

I have a shelf at home on which I have every single one of Elvis’ movies, from Love Me Tender to Change of Habit, plus the documentaries, TV specials, and a good number of Elvis-related movies that don’t star the man himself; Well known stuff like Walk the Line and Elvis & Nixon alongside more obscure stuff like Lonely Street and Elvis Has Left the Building.

Now I’ve gotta make room on that shelf for Never Been to Graceland.

Jamie Klotz’s Diary II Director’s Cut | Full Film

 

Okay, I’ll own it. Jamie Klotz’s Diary II isn’t a particularly good movie. It always lacked the sort of freewheeling spirit of the first one. It’s more downbeat and feels smaller in scale, it has some pretty glaring technical issues, and the plot is neither funny or interesting enough to offset the other shortcomings.

Rather than break down the whole making-of day-by-day in the vein of past “Jamie Klotz’s Origins,” I’d just like to reflect briefly (briefly – ha!) overall on those shortcomings and why I decided to create a “Director’s Cut” that no one asked for.

A) Tone & Scope

Top: Actual shot from original JKD2. Bottom: From the Director’s Cut.

Of all the things to talk about, this is probably… well if not necessarily the most obvious, at least the easiest for me to talk about. From the moment JKD2 starts, it just looks visually dissimilar to the first one. The colors are flat, almost desaturated – forget color grading, there’s hardly any color at all. The entire film looks like the life was sucked out of it.

Well, I’ll be honest, that’s because I didn’t bother to grade it in the first place. After a bumpy production in which I struggled just to get people together to shoot (not a new problem, if you look into past blogs), post-production was practically non-existent. No fingers need to be pointed, I’ll take the fall on all of this – I failed as a director and as a leader. I failed to coordinate and I failed to inspire. I failed to set the proper tone in the script, on the set and on the production overall.

We began filming in earnest in April 2014, a little over 6 months from the premiere of the first Jamie Klotz movie, which was shot essentially in four days. We didn’t finish shooting JKD2 until August. We shot nothing in June and almost nothing between July and August.

Not in the original script, but Aspen still did a great job with this.

The entire scope of the film shifted as a result of scheduling, the weather, and my own limitations as a director. A “post-apocalyptic future” scene was hastily written the morning of a rainy shoot day. That “future” section took place in an unconvincing – but indoors! – civic center (complete with modern cars rolling by outside). The preceding scene, where Jamie and PJ first meet each other, was originally part of a subplot involving Jamie’s mom. That was scrapped and ultimately replaced with a scene at Cascade Springs – again, written mere days before the shoot for said scene. An entire cast member was replaced (the girl who played Rachel originally moved away mid-shoot).

Surprise extras!

The final scene involving The Man (in centrally located Centennial Park) despite being written as jokingly anti-climactic, looked visually uninteresting, and was still marred by passersby (one hilarious outtake has a group of school kids walking into the public restrooms behind Aspen and Yona’s clashed swords) and rapidly changing summer weather, with looming, dark cumulus clouds in the background of several shots which also contributed to horrible visual inconsistency in natural lighting.

 

Literally shot minutes apart

Even in early editing, something about the film felt “off.” Despite a plot that spanned across dimensions and time, the story felt small and constrained. My direction on set had been constrained as well – “stick to the script, this is a complex film” and “Let’s not move the camera so much, let’s keep it on the tripod.” Every smaller decision, whether a reaction to an uncontrolled variable like weather or a deliberate choice like camera movement, led to an overall sense of shrinking scope. JKD was a rollicking carefree adventure sprawled all over Hot Springs. JKD2 was a muted, precise sci-fi story, with specific plot points, locations and serviceable but not necessarily inspired visuals.

Jamie Klotz’s Diary II felt very unlike Jamie Klotz’s Diary, and at the time I couldn’t place my finger on why.

B) Technical Issues

Like I said, by the end of shooting, we were happy to be done… except that we weren’t.

Every project I work on is an experiment of some sort. Some experiments are better suited to disposable shorts that are low-stakes. JKD1 had a lot of experimental elements for me, particularly with special effects, to a varying degree of success. Some, like Sahera’s attack on Dorn, turned out great. Others, like Dr. Lawrence’s 2D transition effect, fell flat (pun absolutely intended!) But in all of those cases, I was never working with anything more than what I had throughout the whole film. I was never introducing something new each time we shot.

The audio in this whole scene sounds muffled because I was trying to mitigate the sound of rain on the metal roof

The first two days of filming JKD2 in April, I had a boom mic that we had plugged directly into our camera. To my dismay, I later learned it was only capturing mono audio, on the left channel. The rain on the metal roof on the civic center led to incomprehensible dialogue inside, and an entire animated sequence (similar to The Man’s Sahera story from JKD1) was scrapped due to incomplete narration that was missed on set. Dialogue replacement recordings did not happen at all due to my failure to properly coordinate and lead.

By our May shoots, I had brought in another camera to use, but one camera was shooting at 30fps and another at 24fps – a horror during editing that would leave some of the footage looking crisp and the rest jagged, or some looking smooth and the rest blurry.

In indoor locations, we had lights rigged up, but often the two lights we had wasn’t enough, so people’s faces were filled in on several shots with flashlights on iPhones. In July, I added a dedicated audio recorder for the boom mic – a recorder that was often set at levels way too low, which led to a need to boost the audio in post, which in turn would require extra clean-up to remove high level hiss or low level buzz. By our last day of filming, one light had stopped working and the other occasionally flickered (as seen in one shot of Isaiah in Jamie’s house.)

I kept adding new elements and equipment all throughout the shoot, not only to experiment with them, but also to continually improve the film – if the audio in one part of the film was in mono and muffled, at least it wouldn’t be in the rest of it! The end result, however, was nothing but inconsistency, across the board.

Actual shot from original JKD2. Note Brandon’s cut off shoe.

The film was left untouched on my hard drive from August until mid-December. There was just too much work to do to fix everything. Finally the weekend before Christmas I sat down and just worked at the film until it was in a “complete” state, at least watchable from beginning to end. I kept trying to work on pieces of it throughout the winter, even asking for Ryan Brewer’s guidance on how best to go about fixing a missing shot (ultimately I just cut around it to leave it out). When I finally rendered it out in March 2015 there were still incomplete visual effects (see Brandon’s disappearing toes when Jamie begins fading from existence the first time), the sound mix was rough, I had dropped the composer I had had lined up when my aspirations for the project were still high, and I could not be bothered to color grade it. I was just ready to premiere it to get the weight of the project off.

C) A Second Chance

After we premiered the film in May 2015, I directed all of my attention toward Never Been to Graceland, ready to put Jamie Klotz’s Diary behind me. I had announced it at the JKD1 premiere in 2013 and had been putting it off to try to get the script right. Graceland would be a feature length film and we did a Kickstarter that summer. Two problems. The Kickstarter flopped, and the script for Graceland at that time sucked. Thankfully some writer friends didn’t mince their words toward that end, but between that and JKD… talk about having my tail tucked between my legs. I sort of resolved that maybe I just had one movie in me, and that JKD1 was a lucky fluke – I couldn’t even argue that JKD2 was at least technically a “movie” in that that ran at 24fps and had sound – after all, the mixed frame rates left the movie looking choppy and the sound wasn’t particularly well-mixed!

I spent summer and autumn 2015 finally revisiting the teen heist movie idea from winter 2013 as “The Christmas Heist.”

I don’t know what it was about The Christmas Heist, but it flicked this switch in me. I suddenly felt like filming again, and I hadn’t even necessarily known up till then that I had sort of subconsciously put myself into a mindset of being “done” with movies.

The missing line “Kaitlyn? I am having some serious deja vu.” from this shot is barely audible in the original cut, which used the camera’s audio. In the Director’s Cut, I was thankfully about to find the boom mic’s track.

In the aftermath of the show, I found myself in a situation a lot like the one I’m in now, sort of unsure about where I want to go creatively, but very much energized. I found myself watching the Jamie Klotz Duology one evening, and after they were done, I realized the film wasn’t finished. The DVDs had all gone out to everyone in the cast, their families, my friends, it was up online… but it wasn’t done. It wasn’t as good as it could have been and no matter how good or bad the film was in the end, I wouldn’t be content with myself if I didn’t fix it, even if I was the only one who ever saw the final cut of the film.

I re-edited the film, not entirely from scratch, but several sequences were. I color graded the whole film and did as much as I could to at visually align it with the first JKD film. I adjusted settings to mitigate the frame rate issues, reworked the sound, including adding score to some scenes which had not had any before, as well as rescuing a line of dialogue that I had thought was lost, and I even added two new sequences, one “rewind” of the film when Jamie travels back into the past the first time and an audio hallucination that Jamie has toward the start of the third act that more explicitly ties story elements hinted at in JKD2 to the plot of the first film and the potential plot of JKD3 (which I still had not entirely ruled out but was admittedly increasingly less likely).

FINAL THOUGHTS

Despite no one else knowing about it or asking for it, I had to give JKD2 a second chance, for my own sake. At the Mini Film Fest that April, I did the first and only screening of the Director’s Cut, alongside the short “The Black Owl,” which had also been left unedited in the aftermath of JKD2. For over a year, no one else has seen this cut of the film. I toyed with putting it online a few times over the past year, but always decided against it. I don’t know what changed my mind now. Maybe that since Graceland and I Sent My Grandma Into The Past have gone well so far, I am comfortable with what this movie is.

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Yes, it’s not a particularly good movie. I can recognize that. But it’s also not an awful movie now, either. It’s not like this is going to be the next viral movie for YouTubers to riff on. There are still moments and shots that I’m proud of, too many flashes of something promising underneath it, despite a flawed technical presentation and weak character development. And despite what this blog might read like, it’s not like we didn’t have fun making this film. In fact, I was able to put together almost an entire half hour (half the length of the movie!) of outtakes – not including the ones during the credit sequences! If you didn’t know any better watching that, you’d think it was the most fun shoot we ever did.

Don’t get me wrong, it was fun, in retrospect. And I absolutely did enjoy working with the cast and crew. Aspen certainly turned in a more nuanced performance of Jamie and Aryona owned the character of PJ. Daniel delivered in spades as The Man (as usual) and everyone else did the very best they could with the direction and script they were given, especially those who were not actors and did not originally intend on even being in the film (like Dustin and Jassmine).

Jamie Klotz’s Diary II is, if nothing else, a complex film. There was a lot I was trying to do and I think I may have overstretched my limitations at the time, narratively, technically and creatively. In many respects Jamie Klotz’s Diary II is merely a stepping stone in my creative progression as a filmmaker and storyteller. And knowing where the lessons its production taught me have led, I’m okay with that.

Jamie Klotz’s Diary Premiere 3 Year Anniversary

It struck me yesterday afternoon that it’s been 3 years since the premiere of the first Jamie Klotz’s Diary movie. Time flies. So last night I went back into the footage for the first time in probably a year and a half and whipped up a little highlight reel featuring a mix of portions from the premiere, never before released outtakes and behind the scenes footage, and even a sneak peek at the movie that I officially announced 3 years ago during that premiere!